Saving Rhinos 
Since 1987

Welcome to the Save African Rhino Foundation​

A voluntary, non-profit organisation that is dedicated to saving the rhino.

Established in 1987, Save African Rhino Foundation is one of the world’s biggest NGO donors to Zimbabwe rhino conservation. We admit there have been highs (overcoming the 1980s/90s rhino wars and rebuilding rhino populations) and lows (the current rhino killing spree that started around 2006 and still continues unabated). 

We remain hopeful and we stay tenacious, as we know that rhinos can be brought back from the brink. As one top-ranking official in the National Parks of Zimbabwe said in 2004: “If it were not for the Save African Rhino Foundation, the black rhinoceros would be extinct in Zimbabwe by now.” All this has been achieved with grassroots support, a loyal membership base and the assistance of SARF’s patrons. 

We thank you all and confirm our ongoing commitment to play our part in stopping the current rhino poaching crisis and saving this amazing animal from extinction in the wild.  

RHINO

ON THE VERGE OF EXTINCTION.

It is estimated that 80% of the global rhino population has been removed over the last 150 years.

volunteers

WE ARE COMMITTED.

“If it were not for the Save African Rhino Foundation, the black rhinos would be extinct in Zimbabwe by now.” – A top-ranking official in the National Parks of Zimbabwe. (June 2004)

lions

JOIN US ON A UNIQUE SAFARI EXPERIENCE.

Your help will make all the difference.

white rhino

YOU CAN HELP US MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Become a member and contribute as much as you like!

DONATE AND HELP SAVE THE RHINOS.

99% of donations raised go to actual projects on the ground, all our administrative and travel overheads are paid for by our committee members.


Presidents Report

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There’s no other way of saying it other than how it is! I’ve been lazy with writing this Newsletter, sorry, but now I’ve started so here we go! As we approach the end of our twenty eighth year in helping rhino conservation in southern Africa, especially in Zimbabwe, we are deeply saddened to report that 2014 has been the worst year in over twenty years for rhino poaching mortalities. At least 1,215 were killed in South Africa (more than 700 in Kruger), 40+ in Kenya, 30+ in Namibia and 11 in Zimbabwe. This overall death rate is now approaching the birth rate and if these trends continue then there will be an overall population decline starting fairly soon.

In this Newsletter there are some sickening photos of five rhinos killed in late February, three from shooting and two from cyanide poisoning at a waterhole. It should also be noted that more than 100,000 elephants have been slaughtered around Africa in the last three years, to fuel the insatiable demand for carved ivory, especially in China where the emerging middle class have disposable income.

We are very keen to continue with our fight and will probably be slightly tweaking some of our strategies and support. This could include some more support for the demand reduction campaign being conducted in Vietnam by Lynn Johnson, one of our members. We also think that to make more effort in Mozambique, the source of at least 80% of rhino poachers in the region, makes good sense.

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For the past three years we have been contributing around the $500,000 mark each year for rhino support, and this goes a long way. This year, for the first time, we have cracked the $600,000 mark! This now brings us close to 6 million dollars since we started in 1987. Typical expenditure is on the provision and maintenance of 4wd vehicles (we have a total of 22 in various states of usefulness), radios, tracking and monitoring equipment, field uniforms and key personnel wages. Our income to provide these goods comes in three forms – memberships and donations, our annual dinner/auction and safari profits from trips. There are about 80 new members who will be reading their first SAVE News so it’s a big welcome to you all and thanks for your support and long may it continue, please. This brings our total membership figure to 318, the highest it’s ever been, so thank you. And it probably wouldn’t be too difficult if each one of you enrolled a new member, please, in the next month? There’s on application form on our website. The rhinos deserve everyone’s support in these ghastly times as an iconic species fights to stay on earth after more than 40 million years of gracing it. 2 SAVE news

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In a move away from our traditional pre Test match dinner (probably because Perth didn’t host one this season!) we changed the format to a panel discussion with four AFL stars – Dean Cox, Luke McPharlin, Matt Priddis and Tendai Mzungu – all under the brilliant moderating of Tim Gossage. And what a resounding success it was and how generous with their time with all our guests were our celebrity stars. Thank you all so much, fellows.

We will probably repeat this format later in the year with some more household names. On top of all this it was a roaring financial success, raising just over $160,000 from one source or another! And much of this was due to the outstanding skills of our celebrity auctioneer, Tiny Hollow, who was fantastic.

We were very sorry to hear of the sad passing of three of our members, Joy Blyth, John Markham and Chris Wiles. Joy first came on our 2004 safari and then three more in later years, as well as climbing Mt Kilimanjaro (when ill) to raise funds for us. John originally joined SAVE back in 1991 after being one of the participants of the David Gower special safari to Botswana, Zambia and Namibia, a fantastic trip. He continued to support us, particularly at our auctions. Chris also went on a safari, 2010, and since then has been a generous donor of his own paintings, on a regular basis. We will miss them all and to their families we extend our deepest sympathies and pass on our thanks for their contribution to rhino conservation.

We also extend our condolences to our treasurer, Nia Carras, on the sad loss of her beloved mother, Daphne. As we go to print we are learning of the tragic and brutal murder of one of our members, Greg Gibbard. For the past five years, Greg had been working at the Painted Dog Conservation Centre on the edge of Hwange NP and was killed in his house – see our tribute later on.

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Our annual safari was conducted last September – Hwange, Kariba, Victoria Falls, Chobe and Okavango Delta – and, as usual, sold out in a few short days. These are always great trips and this year’s one, including Namibia, also sold out in no time at all. So please let me know if you’d like early-bird details for 2016. Lynn Johnson continues to do her sterling work with demand reduction campaigns in Vietnam. We really commend you for taking this project on, and using your professional expertise to drive it to its ultimate goal. Lynn is currently fundraising in USA and we hope she is being successful. Her target is $4 million for a combination of horn infusion in South Africa and advertising campaigns in Vietnam. All assistance would be greatly appreciated by Lynn. Thanks.

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During the year we launched our Rhino Ranger Support Scheme (RRSS), whereby a tax deductible donation of $4,000 enabled a new ranger to be selected, trained, kitted out, and have medical aid and food rations for a year. And as a bonus to our donor we’d host them in a rhino conservancy for six days, with a whole variety of interesting activities, including going on patrol with a ranger, sleeping out, tracking and bushcraft, ALL for a mere $1,000 extra!

Needless to say this has proven to be a great hit with our followers, and sixteen have enlisted for this year or next, resulting, so far, in usd37,000 towards our project target of usd50,000. Thanks very much, everyone, and we are still open to more offers of assistance with RRSS.

Last July, 70 members and guests attended our AGM at Perth Zoo. Besides the usual formal part of the meeting, Ann Jones and Steve Harrison presented on their recent trip to Zimbabwe rhino projects, a most informative talk. The following committee was elected; President – Nicholas Duncan; Vice President – Mike Palmer; Secretary – Rick Hurlbatt; Treasurer – Nia Carras; General committee – Cameron Murray; Evan Litis; Kelly Scott; Nina Hobson and Steve Harrison.

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I’d like to very much thank all the committee, plus the sub committee of Candice, Evelyn, Heather, Helen, Lynn, Mark, Patrick and Tim, for all their ongoing support, effort and commitment throughout the year – fantastic stuff, everyone! Kelly has now resigned and thanks for all your help with the Newsletters, and she has been replaced by Heather, whose main responsibility will be memberships. This year’s AGM will be held at Perth Zoo on Thursday 2 July – please see our official notice of this meeting on the back page of this Newsletter.

Thanks, Evan, for your great work on our Facebook page. Last year we were at 950 likes and now we are up to 2,130 – tremendous effort. Our website is under reconstruction by volunteer Nick Fielden, who will be taking over from Patrick, who is moving to Zimbabwe quite soon. Thanks fellows for your inputs into this project.

We were delighted to be offered some free display space in the foyer of 100 St George’s Terrace building, courtesy of Tenant Services Manager, Jenny Garlick, one of our members. Cameron Murray from Grantham Street Veterinary and Dalkeith Veterinary Clinics, grasped this opportunity for his annual Art Show, which lasted for four weeks. It was great exposure for the rhino cause and thanks to all concerned.

Two of our amazing long term stalwarts in Sydney, Dee Williamson and Shaun Smith, are both struggling with some health issues and we all wish them well for speedy recoveries back to full strength in as quick a time as possible. You’re in our thoughts and prayers.

Mike Palmer continues to make his personal contributions to selected rhino projects in South Africa – thanks very much Mike.

Thanks and best wishes,

Nicholas S. Duncan

Please find the most recent edition of our newsletter here